Tag Archives: adventure

When To Visit Spain: A Photo Guide

Planning your big vacation to Spain? Don’t make the mistake of thinking the whole country is warm and sunny year round. Here’s our quick and dirty on the country’s climate, so you can plan your trip effectively.

fExcursionsmall

As a basic overview, the south of Spain is rather sunny and warm, and though the inland part of the  south suffers extreme heat in summer, the coasts are often temperate.
The Mediterranean coast is usually a bit warmer, whereas the Atlantic coast is a little cooler, the sea is cooler, and there is more wind. The interior is a bit bare, though it does have gorgeous red rock cliffs, caves, and fields of sunflower and olive trees. Where the rivers run there’s more forest, but most of the south doesn’t get enough rainfall for thick vegetation.
Edited-Main-image-Malaga-Spain-E9CPYT-1900x1080_c
The central plains, where Madrid is located, suffers; bitterly cold in the winter and sweltering in high summer, there are a few windows of time when the central areas are quite pleasant. The Central Plains are a bit barren, however, without thick forests. You will see many rolling hills and cedar pines, dropping red needles below their green canopy heads.
Spain, Cascada Rio Cuervo (Cascade at the Source of the Rio Cuervo)
The wine country is high up in the mountains, approaching the foothills of the Sierra de Cantabria. It has rich soil and enough winter precipitation and natural streams that it provides perfect conditions for growing grapes, and you will see hillside after hillside covered in vineyards.
SONY DSC
Catalunya in the north east can be cool and rainy in the winter, and have warm but not scorching summers. It is a very green area with sprawling natural parks. It is also in the foothills of the Pyrenees Mountains which provide a majestic backdrop for the rugged country (and great skiing in the winter!)
barselona-tatili
The north Atlantic coast (Cantabria, Asturias, and Galicia), is green, lush and reminds one of Scotland more than Spain. It has plenty of rain and mist though does not usually swing to either temperature extreme. The sea is cold but good for surfing, and the beaches are generally less populated even in high season than the Mediterranean coast.
ParqueHistoriconavia3
When to Visit
It should be noted here that August is Spain’s own holiday month. Much of the interior of the country is hot, and the natives vacate and go to the coasts or off on their own international trips, making the interior also quiet. However, Spain’s beaches will be packed with people, so if you aren’t in the mood for a crowded resort and you want to go to the sea, best plan your vacation for another time.
 
Andalucia and the South
 Alhambra in Spain
Inland Andalucia in summer is blisteringly hot, but otherwise warm and temperate the rest of the year. The coasts are less extreme in summer. Even in winter you can probably take lunch outside and wear a short sleeve t-shirt around the Mediterranean coast. Anytime outside of July and August is ideal for visiting, though local holidays might draw crowds at any given time.
 
Madrid and the Central Plains
 0606riojpeg-blog480
In the spring, they plains are full of flowers, and a visit between mid April and mid June means you are more likely to miss the rainy season. In September and October the summer still lingers though it is not fierce as it is in July and August, and makes for a very warm and fun trip. If you don’t mind the heat, August might be a scorcher, but as said earlier, it’s also a rather quiet month, and a good way to see Madrid without the normal busy throngs of people trying to get to work and living their daily lives.
Wine Country
 5907483943_e76cdcb66e_b copia
Soria, La Rioja, and the Basque Country are prime in the summer and in the early to mid autumn, during the harvest. They are mountainous and so generally cooler than the rest of the interior, and they also have very cold winters. There are winter mountain sports that draw tourists, but if you are not a ski aficionado, you might find the area far too cold to visit from about November to May.
 
Catalunya and the Pyrenees
 Fski
For an outdoor, beach, and hiking trip, Catalunya is a perfect summer destination. It is not too hot and not overly humid, and has well-kept beaches on the Mediterranean sea and nearby mountains and valleys for whatever a traveler may want. It is also a winter destination for skiiers, as it is a good entry point for tourists headed to the Pyrenees.
The North Atlantic Coast
 tumblr_inline_nlj0fqXtCT1spkgha_500
The North Atlantic has a relatively short but wonderful summer. Much like Catalunya it does not get too hot, but unlike Catalunya, it is a more rugged and less frequented area. The Atlantic is a little cold, but it makes for great surfing and seafood, and for anyone planning to do the Camino de Santiago, July through September is a great time to try it in terms of weather. You will still experience intermittent rains, but the weather stays mild and the entire country is a deciduous jungle, green and wild and beautiful.
 During the winter it rains more, but isn’t entirely unpleasant as the coast keeps it from getting very cold. The area normally boasts more outdoors activities than anything else, so the wet weather might put a damper on your plans.

Trekking Inside Spain’s Prehistoric Caves

It’s a short drive down into Ronda’s ravine, then back up a small mountainside by foot to get to the new entrance of La Pileta Cave. There are roughhewn stairs set into the hill to help travelers find the entrance the site where, 500m into the rock face, our prehistoric ancestors once dwelled. But it wasn’t an easy hike, especially considering I’d already hiked the ravine back in Ronda the day before.

filename-p1090399-jpg

But I make it to the top, to an unceremonious iron gate that looks something between a Resistance friendly steam tunnel entrance and a bootlegger’s storehouse. It is actually there to bar people from getting in to the cave without supervision, and is the entrance to the office and the gift shop. Both are inside the cave, which I find a clever economy of space.

800px-Entrada_pileta

Our guide that day speaks good English and informs us to please watch our step – where we’re going, there’s no natural light. Before we go much further, he lays out some ground rules – everyone must carry a lantern, which he passes out to us. No touching anything, an unsurprising and standard rule inside caves (even touching just the rock face can leave oil and damage the tracks the water takes to form stalactites. These caves are heavy and the open space is vast, he tells us, and one day it won’t be able to support its own weight anymore. We would like to delay that as long as possible).

There will be no photography, either. Not only is it bad for the art, the same reason museums have this policy, but the sensors are bad for the many hundreds of bats who are in residence. So we pocket our phones. After all, we’re in their home, it wouldn’t do to be rude.

Pileta_plano

Though it’s mid-September, and in Andalucía that means just this side of roasting hot, as soon as we start into the cave I start feeling clammy. I see why Jose – that is, our guide – told us to watch our step; everything, every surface of the limestone is slick with a slight and slippery alkaline water sheen. We move slowly up the carved stairs, which had been cut into the rock during previous periods of exploration and excavation.

webcuevasgratis.jpg--575x323

One of the first caves we come to is called the Gallery of Bats. The ceiling is far too high to see any of them, but we are assured that they are there. As they are asleep at 3pm, as good little nocturnal creatures should be, we don’t even hear them chittering. For some guests that is probably a good thing.

The next room on the open circuit (we pass a few small tunnels that Jose tells us are restricted access due to slipping or rock slide hazards), is the Castle Room. It is named for the incredible rock formations that do honestly look like castle turrets. I wonder who could have lived here before? It’s already growing cold and so dark I feel miles beneath the earth. In reality, we’ve only gone in about a hundred meters.

They call this cave Pileta, meaning pool, and in the third ‘room’ I see why. To my right, over a flimsy rope strung along precariously posted rebar, is a deep cave pool. The water is dark, until I shine my lantern over it, and I see that the water is perfectly clear. But the lantern only penetrates so far, and beyond the weak reach of the light I imagine eyeless fish sliding around unseen. Jose tells us there are no fish in these waters, but with the echoes of water dripping and the occasional groaning of the rock, the darkness and the awareness of vast, empty, cold space around me, I find it easy to perceive some eldritch monstrosity waiting in the caverns. I shiver – but it’s mostly with delight.

banos

It’s about this time that we start to see cave paintings. Running animals, symbols no one can discern the true meaning of. Like all prehistoric caves, animals, especially in motion, is a continued motif. In the central nave there are several depictions of what appear to be horses. As to what the symbols mean, well, the automatic go to is fertility. It’s always the easiest to assume that, the guide explained, but realistically there is no hard evidence.

7paleolitico3

Benaoján. Málaga. Andalucía. España. Cueva de la Pileta.

tipos

The paintings are red and black and caper across the walls haphazardly. The guide informs us that most of these paintings probably date to the Solutrean period, that is, the Upper Paleolithic about 25,000-20,000 years ago. These paintings are the origins of art. One has to wonder, were they for didactic purposes? Showing the youngers how to hunt and forage? Warnings? Or just for the pure fun of drawing them?

From the central nave to the Hall of the Fish, as they call it, we see many more drawings, and other evidences of human occupation. It seems to me, and the guide confirms, that the occupation was aggregate, meaning it was not only one people at one time that used this cave for shelter. There is evidence of bone disposal and rock deposits – the kind you find when early peoples make stone tools and discard the flakes they don’t need. There is also evidence of fires having burned in alcoves, and some smoke residue still on the walls. Somehow the atmosphere of the cave has preserved all of this, and it’s aweing.

cueva.revista

We’re almost 400m back now and it has taken us a while, carefully stepping, sometimes slipping, to navigate our way back here. We would have been in total darkness had it not been for the lanterns. I try to imagine any diurnal creature living in here, indeed, ones that make art and share meals. The space is certainly big enough to house a whole community, but how could anyone bear living in this kind of dank cold? It’s Tolkienian. I expect something slinky to coalesce beside me and ask me riddles in the dark.

Finally we arrive at the last chamber of the cave, well, the last one we’re able to visit. The final chamber, Jose says, is too dangerous to go into, the same as the subterranean caves that run beneath us (at several points during our 45 minute long trek I have had creeping moments of realization that there is only one layer of rock between us and the yawning caverns beneath the ones I’m already in. The weight of the mountain bears down on me in those moments). In this final chamber we see the famous Fish. It’s a pretty good rendering. Even though some of these drawings seem crude, the sense of motion and proportion is not bad, especially considering they’re drawn on uneven limestone. Probably better than I could do!

cortijo-el-guarda-fish-piletacueva_pileta_03

The Fish solidifies the idea that these caves are from the Solutrean period, which was around the time fishing as a human practice was beginning to develop. There are other depictions of fish across southern Spain in caves near to this one from the same period. But none as big and as well preserved as this one.

Around the Fish (as you can see) are a lot of hash marks. The other animals have them too, some that seem to correspond with the animal drawing, some that are simply hash marks by themselves. Common postulation is a numerical notation, or a calendar. Seems logical enough.

6a00d835494ab953ef0147e3e212f3970b

There is also an alcove that is wall to wall, floor to ceiling covered in rough depictions of what appear to be female genitalia. ‘Fertility’ the guide says again. Fertility is always the going theory. Someone asks whether or not this could be seen as a form of religion. The guide, nor I, am completely convinced. Begging for luck or associating symbols with a human event (such as drawings of female genitails with healthy childbirth), does not a religion make (despite a ‘venus’ having been found in the Gallery of Bats. It is an hourglass shaped creation that looks more like a bowtie than a venus, so it’s intention is much more debatable than the obvious alcove of genitalia). There isn’t any hard evidence of religious practice, so it might be a stretch to call this, ah, coital corner a belief in a Goddess. Could it have been? Could it have been the precursor to a more complex and fleshed out belief system? Anything’s possible, but no one really knows.

CaveRecordingsCoverTest1front-720x380

As the guide is explaining this someone next to me nudges me. Jose’s got a flashlight, not a lantern, and it’s resting on his shoulder, the beam pointed up. It spotlights on the end of a stalactite, where a tiny bat yawns and stretches out one wing. It’s about three feet up from Jose’s head. Turn off the lights, it seems to say, don’t you know what time it is?

It’s time to be heading out, the tour is ending. We carefully make our way back through the caves, two people slipping but thankfully not falling. Sturdy shoes are a must for this adventure. Once we’re back to the gift shop area, there are books about the cave paintings, in Spanish and in English, and postcards with some decent photographs of what we couldn’t take pictures of. None of it is expensive, and the cave needs the money for upkeep. One of these days, Jose says, they want to do more exploration of the lower chambers. But that takes grant money and a lot of equipment.

It is a shame they haven’t excavated the rest, because there seem to be more skeletal deposits and perhaps other paintings in the caves below. Still, there’s time. The cave might eventually collapse in on itself as Jose told us, but something tells me it’s going to be around, at least for a little while longer.

Many thanks to the Bullón family for the tour and the photos.

Interested in the Cuevas de la Pileta? Check out our trips to Ronda or contact us to build your own trip that includes this prehistoric wonder.

Archaeology 101: The Dolmens of Antquera

First of all, let’s ask, what is a dolmen, anyway?

Dolmens are single chamber, megalithic funerary structures that generally consist of two or more standing stones (called orthostats) with a capstone on top. They were often set into hills or covered in earth to form barrows.

image

Most of these structures, which are peppered all over Western Europe, are from the Early Neolithic, that is, 4,000-3,000 bce, or around 6,000-5,000 years ago, though some are from as late as the Early Chalcolithic.

image

Before talking about the dolmens themselves, let’s talk about the area of Antequera. It is in a lower lying depression, surrounded by El Torcal National Park to the South (a varied range of Karst mountains), La Peña to the East (which I will discuss later), and then several series of high hillocks to the North and West. The area would have been very different 5,500 years ago, around when the dolmens were built. Paleoenvironmental evidence from the area suggests there were many lakes and ponds, and dense pine and oak forests. Many types of herbs and flowers flourished in the damp climate, and pastures and dry copses of olive trees like the picture above were much rarer at the time.

Humans left their mark on the area, as several other sites have been found surrounding the two main dolmens, though whether or not all of these sites are contemporary to each other is still unknown. The point being, it was a rich area that saw quite a bit of human activity and modification during the mid Neolithic era.

image

The Dolmen de Viera is the older of the two dolmens we are going to talk about here. When it dates to is unclear, but experts say between 5,800 to 4,500 years ago. As with the majority of European megalithic tombs, this dolmen is oriented just south of the summer rising sun (azimuth of 96 degrees).

As with many neolithic, so termed ‘animist’ societies, this type of concordance with solar activity was common, and not only seen with megalithic structures. The question always asked is ‘why?’ when examining these orientations, but that is a very complicated answer, and we will leave it for another article. Suffice to say that the Dolmen de Viera follows the same kind of pattern that is expected from a society that viewed its world as cyclic and reccurrent as opposed to linear.

image

As you can see the interior of the structure is lintelled and high enough for an average height person to walk down. It is (conincidentally enough :p ) considered a corridor tomb which ends in a funerary chamber. In short, it is a giant, elongated container under a mound of earth.

The tomb was found empty and looted, however since megalithic funeral rite across the continent was ritualized and strictly repetitive down to details, we can make some assumptions about what Viera was used for; burials at this time were collective and often times dozens of skeletons are found inside these chambers. However, it is not necessarily that they were all interred simultaneously, but also possibly of varying generations. Bodies were laid out on the ground, other, older skeletons often shoved out of the way to make room for the newly dead. These corpses were always accompanied by grave goods, from tools to shoes to arrows and knives or bowls.

image

If the Dolmen de Viera is typical of the structures across the continent, then the Dolmen de Menga is the complete opposite. It is still a corridor tomb that is under a barrow mound with a chamber at the end, but that is where the similarities end.

First of all, it is huge. The slabs used to create this dolmen are positively enormous and the amount of labor that must have gone into its construction moreso, especially considering it was built in the 3rd milennium bce. It reaches a height of 3.5m in the atrium, truly impressive, and also boasts three large pillars, presumably to help bear the weight of the capstones. But they also give the space more the feel of a temple, and experts are currently postulating on Menga’s possible other uses aside from only the funerary.

image

Second of all, in the atrium we can find an almost 20m deep shaft dug into the sandstone that is in alignment with the three pillars.

image

It is unclear what the purpose of this shaft would have been. It is a rather unusual element in a megalithic structure such as this. But, also, as this dolmen was previously excavated to some degree in 1847, it is not clear if the shaft was explored by or caused by the previous excavation.

Lastly, this dolmen faces Northeast (azimuth of 45 degrees) unlike most of dolmens. This notable difference from other similar structures is due to the presence of La Peña, which dominates the skyline and is directly in front of the mouth of the Dolmen de Menga.

image

It is assumed that La Peña, due to its distinct appearance as a human face and also the positioning of the Dolmen de Menga, played a large role in the area’s prehistoric culture. In the ‘chin’ of the mountain archaeologists have also uncovered a post paleolithic cave which has a myriad of early human drawings.

image

It does seem that the opening to Menga faces directly to this cave, but whether or not the neolithic society who made the dolmen were aware of this cave is unknown.

There is a third structure, the Dolmen del Romeral, but that is a very different structure that is almost 1,500 years later than the two dolmens we have visited here, and so, we will visit it another time.

For now, stay megalithic my fellow archaeologists.

If you want more information about the Dolmenes de Antequera, you can visit the website of the Conjunto Arqueolóico right here.

Do you want to visit these incredible dolmens? Well now you can, with Colorfully Spain’s new Fall & Winter programming package to Andalucia. Click here for more details!

Interview with Surf Guru Henalu de Barros

As we have said before in this blog, Spain offers a wide variety of sports, activities, food, color, culture, and history. Every season we aim to find an expert in one of Spain’s tourist draws, and run an interview with them.

This month, since surf and beach season is upon us, we got the pleasure of having a chat with professional surf instructor Henalu de Barros. Henalu is the English language instructor at our partner Alma Surf School, in Asturias, Northern Spain.

Asturias2

ColorfullySpain: So, how did you learn how to surf? And where?

Henalu de Barros: While my first steps into the world of surf were on Lanzarote, a small island in the Canaries, when I really started getting into the sport was when I had my first adventure in the Bay of Biscay, in the Principality of Asturias. This probably seems contradictory, since the climate in Lanzarote is warm and a lot more agreeable for water sport than the often inclement weather in Asturias, but it is also true that no one exactly knows what goes on in the head of a 12 year old. Somehow, and for whatever reason, that’s when I decided to head back to the ocean as I’d done plenty of times, but this time with a board under my arm. I decided to really commit myself to the sport at Frexulfe, a beautiful natural beach in the western stretch of Asturias. After that, I started going all over the world just trying to enjoy the uncountable and wonderful experiences surfing has to offer, and of course, like all surfers, looking for “the perfect wave”.

tumblr_inline_nlj0fdbnFU1spkgha_500

CS: What are, in your opinion, the three best things about surfing?

HdB: One, surfing, as I once heard a pro surfer in Hawaii say, “is a sport, a lifestyle, and an art form where the wave is your canvas”. What I can add myself to this beautiful quote is that surfing is in essence a way of making a personal connection with something so absolutely changing and unfathomable as the sea. This connection might sound a bit mystical, but it is the truth, and if you let it and you pay enough attention, you can learn so much about yourself and your own abilities. That is, for me, the most beautiful part of surfing, even though it is frustrating at times, because you don´t always know exactly what you should be learning with each ‘lesson’.

Second, I would have to say, is without a doubt, the pure enjoyment and fun that comes along with throwing yourself into the sea to play in the waves and look for adventure. That is definitely one of the best things about surfing, and better still if these moments are in the company of friends and family.

Third, but no less important, surfing challenges you every time you head into the water – and as I said before, it is constantly changing with no warning, and there is nothing you can really do about that. But why do I say surfing challenges you? Well, you need to learn to adapt and react in the middle of everything, at high speeds. Also you need to correct errors from time to time, so you need to learn to be self critical and make an effort towards personal improvement – all things that can be subsequently applied to other aspects of life.

Of course, doing that alone won’t make you a good surfer, you first have to understand and internalize what on paper looks nice and easy. But as I said, that is the challenge, and the beauty of it.

tumblr_inline_nlj0fqXtCT1spkgha_500

CS: You and your family have established a surf school in Asturias – why Spain? And why Asturias specifically?

HdB: Probably being Spanish residents ourselves was a major influence in that decisions, but there were many other factors: Spain is without a doubt a country with impressive landscapes and the northern coast offers some of the best and most beautiful beaches I’ve ever seen, and I have to say I have visited many beautiful beaches in a variety of places.

Asturias, just like the publicity states, is a natural paradise, and all you have to do is visit for a day to realize how true that is. So of course, where better to surf than in such a dreamy place like the beach at Frexulfe, which is why I started out surfing there.

tumblr_inline_nlj0b3TK3D1spkgha_500

CS: So, you would say Asturias is a good place to start learning to surf? What about for veteran surfers?

HThe Asturian coast is the perfect place to start out, thanks to all the sandy beaches that offer easy access; this in turn assures safety during beginner surfing sessions. And of course, another important factor is that there are always surfable waves thanks to the swell from the Atlantic Ocean, so there is almost never a day that you can’t hit the water and catch at least a few good waves.

For those surfers already at an intermediate level, there are a few beaches that have good waves and also a certain level of difficulty, for honing skills and working on technique. Overall, the coast here has something for everyone, every level.

Asturias1

CS: So, tell me more about Alma Surf School, and what its objective is? Do you offer just surfing lessons or other activities as well?

The consuming passion and devotion for surfing in our family is what defines the school. We are dedicated to understanding not only the sport, but the life style, and how it is different for different generations, so that we can offer anyone who wants it the chance to open themselves up to the world of surf and learn to see things from different perspectives. The surf school teaches surfing, yes, but also helps our surfers get to know new people, as well as themselves, in a fun and accessible way. It helps combat getting in a rut, weight gain, and stress. This is because surfing reinforces self-confidence and healthy self-criticism, willpower to better oneself, and also just gives you a chance to socialize. And of course, the sea offers a type of relaxation and calm like no other place on earth.

At the school we offer not only beginner and lower intermediate classes, but also more advanced classes in technique that include video correction, and also ‘mental surfing’ among other things (check out our website for more information). Our latest addition is stand up paddle surfing, both sea and river routes, which entail floating down mountain and forest lined rivers, with stops for exploring areas of interest.

AsturiasSurf

CS: I noticed a new program as well, called Surf the Lead – can you tell me about that?

This project, built ground up with great passion on the part of my family and our collaborators, is a program built around activities that let the participants not only learn the sport of surfing, but the philosophy as well, and then taking these lessons and benefits to the level of personal benefit and betterment. The program is designed to help translate what the participants learn about themselves and their own development to real world application, with relation to their social lives, work, or school. In order to get these results we have created a fusion course that joins the sport with a leadership workshop which is required of all the participants.

With Surf the Lead, the students get to stay in a typical house from the region, and at the opening night dinner we reinforce that our main objective is for them to have fun, and also be safe, and that the living experience will work out best if it is based on mutual respect. Over the next two or three weeks during the program, they will learn not only how to surf but also have the opportunity to try other sports like yoga, paddle surf, hiking, etc. We have games and downtime directed around leadership and trust building, and also English classes if they so desire.

We like to emphasize that it is fun learning, because we never want any of the development to be forced. The goal is to grow organically, at the individual’s pace.

And of course, the food, we can’t forget that. It’s always prepared fresh and with whatever requirements an individual might have, but based on a healthy diet that the participants need to keep up with the active lifestyle. We always adapt to whatever intolerance or allergy someone might have, as this whole program is, at its core, about well being.

tumblr_inline_nlj0dsQdsR1spkgha_500

Many thanks to Henalu for the great and informative interview. At Colorfully Spain, we prize partners like Alma Surf School who are so obviously invested in not only the well being and satisfaction of our clients, but also in finding new and refreshing ways to present their corner of the world to others.

Colorfully is happy to announce that starting in June of 2016 we will be offering tours Asturias and Playa Frexulfe so our clients can also enjoy the wild fun of Northern Spain’s World of Surf. So if you are interesting in surf classes with Henalu, paddle surfing and tapas crawling around the gorgeous river-fed landscape, and hiking around some 3,000 year old Celtiberian hill forts, then contact us today to book your trip.

 

Surf Gastronomy Fusion Tours in Asturias

Colorfully Spain announces brand new, exciting surf based tours in northern Spain for the summer of 2016!

The north of Spain is not only a great place to eat and taste wine, it’s also a natural paradise and a heaven for hikers and surfers alike. Now, Colorfully is offering innovative new tours that combine the two!

00841

From paddle surfing down the green mountain rivers, stopping at cider houses along the way, to surfing by day and tapas crawls by night, Colorfully has a range of options for outdoor adventurers. And of course, a sampling of the region’s history and archaeology, from the castros of the north, to the church of Santiago de Compostela.

tumblr_inline_nlj0dsQdsR1spkgha_500

If you are interested in our outdoor adventure focused summer packages, contact us for more information!

Archaeology Tours in Andalucía

Andalucia, though most known for sea and sun, has a wealth of cultural and natural resources to offer visitors. Colorfully Spain’s latest programs for autumn and winter highlight the most interesting and unknown gems of Spain’s southernmost region.

From the traditional food of Antequera, to the Paleolithic caves of Ronda, our new tours explore a wide range of exciting archaeological sites, traditional, non touristic restaurants and markets, cultural heritage sites, and more.

We offer our clients a chance to interact and learn about Spain through participation, with cooking lessons, dance classes and spectaculars, and outdoor adventure, led by guides who are experts in their fields, and with 24 hour a day, gate to gate bilingual service.

While we will always go to the main sites – who would miss out on the Alhambra? – we also offer clients the road less traveled, heading to small villages with deep histories, so they will take away experiences other trips will never duplicate.

 If you are interested in more information about our Southern Routes for this autumn, winter, and spring, don’t hesitate to contact us!

A New Way to Travel Europe

Each contact with a human being is so rare, so precious, one should preserve it.
― Anaïs Nin

We live in a world which is rapidly changing. People say it is growing smaller, as technology links us all closer together. But, the world is not smaller than it was. It is wide, it is wild, and it is full of incredible things. And we are not closer solely because we have the ability to speak to each other. We are closer because we can travel together, we can meet each other, and we can see and learn how much there is beyond our own front doors.

The world is an incredible place. And we want to help you explore it.

Colorfully Spain is an innovative new travel agency that is dedicated to a cultural and educational form of travel. We don’t just offer package tours and main sights.  Our tours are specifically designed to provide opportunities to engage, so you can learn by talking and doing.

What we offer:

  • A myriad of optional activities from cooking classes as well as fine dining, dancing lessons as well as shows, boating, wine tasting, and more.
  • Exclusive access to archaeological sites across the country.
  • Routes to smaller areas largely untouched by tourism.
  • Small, intimate group tours.
  • Accomodation for any price range.
  • Bilingual guides who are experts in their fields.
  • Self made and self guided trips for independent travelers.
  • 24 hour a day, gate-to-gate bilingual service via cell phone.

What we don’t offer:

  • Standard packages you can find anywhere.
  • Hidden fees.
  • Large group tours.

We also practice cultural sustainability as much as we can, meaning that strive to support the places we visit by partnering with establishments who buy local produce or services from their home zone, and who try to maintain their traditional practices. It’s our way of showing respect to our country; we don’t want to lose the culture that makes us Spanish, so we’re here to support that in whatever ways we can.

What do you want from your vacation? Do you want a good price for quality accommodations, 24 hour bilingual service by phone, unique itineraries that will take you through living cities and incredible archaeological sites, and interactive classes where you can learn to dance, cook, surf, sail, or whatever you can imagine?

Well, we’ve got that.

Are you ready to explore?

We are waiting for you.

 www.colorfullyspain.com

The world is an incredible place. We want to help you explore it.